3 Internet of Things "Items" you need to know!

The cloud has allowed the IoT to emerge.  What is the IoT?   It is a term that describes the growing network of objects that can communicate with each other and complete tasks without any human involvement having to take place.  In November 2014, Gartner stated that there will be 4.9 billion connected "things" in use by the end of 2015,  Wow!

With all these connected devices, connectivity will be the biggest part of it.   5G is being called the smartest network ever and is required for IoT to be successful.

All of us will need to know about the IoT!  Here's 3 items that are in all the IoT space! 

Internet of Everything.   ABI Research summed it up well by explaining that the IoE has three subsystems: IoT, the Internet of Humans (human input to machines in any form) and the Internet of Digital (generating data and communicating it on for further use).

The Raspberry Pi is a series of credit card-sized single-board computers developed in the UK by the Raspberry Pi Foundation with the intention of promoting the teaching of basic computer science in schools.

MQTT.   In order to allow IoT data to flow from producers (sensors on the field) to consumers (IT backends, web apps, etc.), MQTT is an OASIS standard that implements a publish-subscribe communication model. It has several QoS levels making it easy to find the perfect tradeoff between reliability and resources/bandwidth usage.

 

 

 


3…2...1… Houston, we have lift off! IBM at the NASA Challenge with Internet of Things leading!

Over the weekend of April 11th and 12th, IBM partnered with NASA on their International Space Apps Challenge. Over 12,000 attendees participated in the 48-hour hackathon in 133 cities around the world creating apps to solve some of the most challenging issues we face here on earth, in space, around robotics and as human beings.   IBM Bluemix was used as a development platform during this hackathon and we saw Bluemix adopted by more than 3600 developers during this event.

Combining the real time data provided by NASA about earth & space, and the ready-to-use Cloud services and app development tools provided by Bluemix,  developers rapidly created powerful solutions to address the challenges we see everyday.     .NASA Astronaut Catherine "Cady" Coleman made this bold statement at the New York City Main Stage Event:  "Having the tools, having a platform like Bluemix, to get these people in this place solves problems that we don't have enough people to solve, and I think we're going to see some amazing solutions." - Watch the video at youtu.be/88KtkdVD8gs.

In this blog, I want to drill in and highlight three key things that I have learned

1. Creativity by combining IoT data and mobile

Wildfires are an immediate danger when they are close to human communities. When evacuating these areas, it turns out that the chosen route is crucial to people's survival.  A NYC based team created the  Wildfire Navigator Mobile IoT App that analyzes the CO2 sensor data and combines real time imagery coming from NASA satellites Aqua and Terra, and builds optimized safest route API using Bluemix Python services. The route API will make predictions about potential areas that wildfires can spread to. Finding routes will take into consideration these predictions. Learn more at ibm.biz/BdXHrr

One of the NASA Space App topics was "Food Direction" - the country decision makers and the general public need to to understand the self-sufficiency of their country across decades and under fluctuating market conditions. To meet this challenge,  Noordwijk team from Europe created the app "Can You Feed Me?".    This Android app uses space data combined with other data sources to create insight into the imports and exports of food in the world.  It was built to withstand global demand and supply data. The app's backend mapping web service was built on Bluemix using its Web app services and is capable of telling if there’s enough food for the population of a specific country. Learn more at ibm.biz/BdXHj8

dash

The Great British Space Race, created an app that uses British astronaut Tim Peake's inaugural mission to the ISS to encourage people on Earth to keep fit. Keeping track of the exercise they do, participants can pit themselves against friends to earn mission badges and astronaut wings as they race towards orbit.  Groups can challenge each other, and in conjunction with gyms, teams across the world can race around the solar system by earning "rocket fuel" for their physical exercise.

2. Women can do this too

In keeping with NASA's focus on Women in Data for the 2015 Space Apps Challenge, the Space Apps Data Bootcamp was led by many exceptional women making an impact on the world through their engagement with data. This was NASA’s first Data Bootcamp and it was a huge success for women in or interested in coding.

Women of all ages got a chance to hear several women panelist speak about their first hackathons, problem solving tips, and more. Panelists included 13-year-old Olivia Ross, who represented Black Girls CODE. She got started in coding when she was just 11 and definitely embodies what we’re looking for in future Bluemixers. Learn more at ibm.biz/BdXHsd. two creative solutions out of these thousands of apps that developers came up with in solving our earth problem in the 48 hour period.

olivia IMG_6937

My colleagues at IBM have recognized this trend and will build programs that specifically help women of all ages to take the leap and help them acquire necessary skills that transform their ideas into the next great product.

3. Innovation is happening everywhere.

In this rapidly evolving world, we have transitioned into an innovation economy - where capital and computing infrastructure is becoming a commodity, while creativity + speed have emerged as real differentiators in how a business can leapfrog their competition.   The #SpaceApps challenge has shown that by leveraging developer's creativity and a rapid innovation platform's speed, you can create new solutions within 48 hours.  I challenge your team to join us in our future Hackathons that my colleagues have created to challenge you to create your innovative solutions. http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/events/


Internet of Things Foosball on BlueMix With Social Linkage!

Yes, the students have done it!  This is an Internet of Things Foosball Table designed by Fabian Eitel and Marcel Seibold.  In this picture, they are the 2 gentlemen playing against me !!

thumb_IMG_0357_1024This table with sensors throughout does the following: 

  • It tweets the scores.
  • It rates the probability of the winning team (my team was not rated high -- even though I did score one point!)
  • Others can tweet to cheer you on!

Here you can find our final result in Twitter as a little souvenir.   https://twitter.com/TischkickerEhn/status/590534529464467456)

It is a very innovative way to showcase the value of the Cloud.   Marcel and Fabian are not hard core coders but were able to get this up and coming quickly because of Bluemix.

How does it work?

Sensors capture the "game" and then send the results to the cloud, where the data is analyzed and stored.   Then based on the game, Tweets are automatically sent and the probablity of a Winner Calculated!

What fun!

foosball Capture

 


The Weather Channel and IBM using IoT and IBM Cloud to "change" the business of weather!

I am very excited for the Partnership of the Weather Channel and IBM!   IBM and The Weather Company through WSI, its global B2B division, today announced a groundbreaking global strategic alliance to integrate real-time weather insights into business to improve operational performance and decision-making.

As part of the alliance, The Weather Company, including WSI will shift its massive weather data services platform to the IBM Cloud and integrate its data with IBM analytics and cloud services.

IBM and WSI will deliver new cloud services to businesses in three key ways:

  • Watson Analytics for Weather: IBM and WSI will enable easy integration of historical and real-time weather data in business operations and decision making with IBM analytics platforms such as Watson Analytics. The companies will jointly develop industry solutions for insurance, energy & utilities, retail and logistics among others.
  • Cloud and Mobile App Developer Tools: Entrepreneurs and software developers will be able to rapidly build mobile and web apps that take advantage of WSI data combined with data from operational systems, connected devices and sensors using advanced analytics through Bluemix, IBM’s cloud application development platform.
  • Business and Operational Weather Expertise: Thousands of consultants from across IBM Global Business Services will be trained to combine WSI data with other sources to more effectively interpret industry pain points, providing clients new insights that solve business problems.

Check out https://ibm.biz/IoTandWeather

I am also loving our VINE videos to use social media showcase the power of this announcement.    https://vine.co/u/1025833884602232832

A YouTube Video, Harnessing the power of Weather: IBM and The Weather Company, voiced by The Weather Channel(R) Meteorologist Jim Cantore, this video offers an overview of IBM and The Weather Company's alliance to bring advanced weather insights to business.

 


Insight Robotics WINS the IBM Entrepreneur of the Year!

Check out their amazing IOT solution that is changing the world!!!


Santa's Little Helper! Internet of Things!

My take on Santa with help from the Internet of Things!

 


Internet of Things The Foundation of Success!

This blog is my third on Internet of Things.

I began by discussing how the IOT is both like, and unlike, the Internet. It is critical that you focus on that which differentiates the IoT from the Internet and refineyour expertise, skills and partnerships to capitalize on those differences.

Then we discussed the innovators and the operators.  There are two basic groups of IoT use cases. One is centered around enterprises and entrepreneurs looking to invent new IoT products or services, and the other focused on those looking to optimize their operations

The third concept I’d like to share is one that starts to create some level of relationship and hierarchy around technology. But really, this point is less about prioritization and more about understanding how the pieces of your infrastructure puzzle fit together to bring you the best big picture the IoT has to offer.

foundation

The IoT is the next concentric circle around the cloud. And of course, it is populated by things. But it’s also populated with people.

All the work we are doing now in the cloud, analytics and mobile is significant, and there is immediate business impact for all of it. And we typically have a very clear perspective on why we do it, how we justify the investment. And until now, the reason for why we have done it hasn’t been immediately focused on the IoT.

But the truth is, whether we know it or not, when we make those investments in cloud, analytics and mobile infrastructure, we’re laying the foundation for the IoT.

And that foundation work is vital, if often under appreciated, because everything else depends on the stability of that layer. Ask any architect, and she’ll tell you how important a solid foundation is to the overall integrity of the structure, to the whole. Everything else depends on it.

And we have evidence all around us that poorly established foundations will ultimately unsettle even the most beautifully designed architecture.

So when we build our Internet of Things, we must build it on a robust and highly secure foundation. In other words, we need to balance our focus on “things” with an equal focus on the people who use those things.

And if we don’t, we can expect the structure to ultimately crumble.

Without the right foundation, the right infrastructure, our Internet of Things is a house of cards waiting for a puff of wind to come along and rip it apart. But with a strong, stable foundation, we give our IoT structure the opportunity to stand straight and tall as a beacon for those that follow in our tracks.

Now where does all of this leave us today?

We must have the courage to undertake the journey, to be bold in our actions.  (Yes, I did write a book called "Get Bold")  There’s no question that we’ll need to adjust course, optimize, iterate. We also know that we’ll need to have the right partners with the right level of expertise and experience and broad level of capabilities.

And we’ll need to keep moving down this path. And when there is no path, we must be willing and able to forge the way and blaze our own.

Because while the IoT is arguably defined, at least in part, by the new treasure troves of data now being generated and made available to us...

… it’s also certainly defined by a constant, unforgiving and irrefutable demand for innovation.

And the key today is that, as your competitors arrive at your milestone of innovation, you’ve already moved again. Because you never stopped innovating. You are, and must be, absolutely relentless in your pursuit of innovation.

We must all learn to translate this ever-growing global network of data and ideas and “things” into something that makes your business more profitable—and then make sure we’re in a position to accommodate it. Something that helps your city run more smoothly. Helps you save more lives. Helps us all answer that question, “why bother listening?”

So let me know your approach to IoT!!!


Internet of Things: Inventors and Operators

IoT operators and makers

As a continuation of the Internal of Things discussion yesterday, our second key idea I’d like to discuss is that there are two basic groups of IoT use cases. One is centered around enterprises and entrepreneurs looking to invent new IoT products or services, and the other focused on those looking to optimize their operations. And the truth is that many of our clients, the businesses who stand to gain or lose the most based on their IoT strategy, represent both roles. They are inventors, and they are operators as well.

Let’s say you’re looking to invent new IoT offerings. You must invent and innovate and improve products with interconnections in mind. Think about the type of data those products are generating or are capable of generating.

What new connections are you making, and how will you capitalize on those connections? How will you use the data? What insights are you able to uncover, and how will you leverage them to do what you do better? What new capabilities will the data enable?

There’s a new app, one of the winners of our SportsHack Challenge this year at Impact, that is capable of mapping crime data to create safe run routes, allowing runners to determine where the safest nearby areas are to run, anywhere in the world. Clever stuff.

And to be clear, all innovations or inventions are not focused on an app or product or service itself. Some of the better, more significant innovations over the last few years are focused on evolving or transforming the way people interact with those things. Or on how products and services interact with other devices or organizations.

An example is how Yarra Trams is using IBM big data, mobile, analytics and cloud technology to improve service reliability and get passengers where they need to be, faster and more efficiently than ever before.

Or maybe you are focused on optimizing your operations, bringing things together to create new value. Doesn’t matter if it’s a global supply chain, a production line, a fleet of rental cars or a server farm. And the irony is that today, a fleet of cars actually isn’t that different from a server farm—just on wheels.

Being an operator is about creating the system using technology from multiple vendors and then analyzing, synthesizing and optimizing, fighting to make it work better, more seamlessly, more fluidly.

The new connected car IBM will be working on with Toyota is an excellent example, where these guys are transforming everyday vehicles to gather all sorts of data that can adjust the suspension to accommodate road conditions, send drivers text alerts in real time about inclement weather and so much more.

As an example, we (IBM) helped the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC WASA) integrate advanced analytics with asset management software to reduce downtime with predictive maintenance on its aging infrastructure. DC WASA instrumented thousands of water meters with automated meter reading technology that enables the Authority to use data to create a deeper understanding of usage patterns to provide citizens with more sophisticated pricing and demand response options.

Or maybe you’re both an inventor and an operator.

The point is simply that it’s important to understand the primary IoT use cases, and it’s also important that you know exactly how you or your clients fit into those use cases to build the right strategy for optimizing the IoT.

Tomorrow I will discuss the level of relationship and hierarchy around technology. But really, this point is less about prioritization and more about understanding how the pieces of your infrastructure puzzle fit together to bring you the best big picture the IoT has to offer.  The IoT is the next concentric circle around the cloud. And of course, it is populated by things. But it’s also populated with people.